Ten Tips for SUV Owners

Ten Tips for SUV Owners

It's a rare motorist who doesn't have strong feelings about today's sport utility vehicles. Love 'em or hate 'em, one thing is certain-just like their automobile cousins, SUVs last longer, operate more efficiently, and command a higher resale value when they are properly maintained and serviced.

For those too busy or too overwhelmed by modern vehicles to perform their own maintenance, the pros at the non-profit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) offer some advice on choosing a repair establishment:

  • Start shopping for a repair facility before you need one.
  • Ask friends and associates for recommendations; consult local consumer organizations.
  • Arrange for alternate transportation in advance so you will not feel forced to choose a shop based solely on location.
  • Look for a neat, well organized facility, with vehicles in the parking lot equal in value to your own and modern equipment in the service bays.
  • Look for a courteous staff, with a service writer willing to answer all of your questions.
  • Look for posted policies regarding labor rates, diagnostic fees, guarantees, acceptable methods of payment, etc.
  • Ask if the repair facility usually handles your type of repair work.
  • Start off with a minor job and progress to more complex work if you are pleased with the establishment.
  • Look for signs of professionalism in the customer service area such as civic, community, or customer service awards.
  • Look for evidence of qualified technicians: trade school diplomas, certificates of advanced course work, and certification of the technicians by ASE.

For ASE’s Glove Box Tips, click here.

The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) was founded in 1972 as a non-profit, independent organization dedicated to improving the quality of automotive service and repair through the voluntary testing and certification of automotive technicians. ASE-certified technicians wear blue and white ASE shoulder insignia and carry credentials listing their exact area(s) of certification. Their employers often display the blue and white ASE sign.